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Fish Fotos

Recalling last summer’s not so (photographically speaking) successful Vancouver Aquarium outing, I made sure this time to pack the Pentax 100mm f/2.8 macro, and the 25-year old Vivitar 28mm f/2 wide angle, in my new Lowepro Flipside 400 AW camera bag.  These two lenses are optically well-suited for the dimly-lit tanks and displays.  They are relatively “fast”, permitting  exposures at shutter speeds two to four times faster than with the f/4 lens I used last year.  This translates to being better able to freeze fish in mid-motion at lower ISO settings.  Less blur with less noise. 

Both lenses also have small minimum focus distances, allowing for closeups.

However, the Vivitar is an all-manual lens, with limited meter coupling to the camera, and of course, no autofocus.  Moreover, today’s cameras are legacy-averse when it comes to the focusing screen.  My Pentax K20D D-SLR is no exception.  It was a bitch to track and focus at the same time.

However, however, I got some keepers.  Tip: go for the slow-moving fish!

Fish 1: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/20s; manual focus

Fish 1: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/20s; manual focus

Fish 2: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/20s; manual focus

Fish 2: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/20s; manual focus

Fish 4: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/30s; manual focus

Fish 4: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/30s; manual focus

Fish 5 (Banggai Cardinal Fish): taken with Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/15s; manual focus

Fish 5 (Banggai Cardinal Fish): taken with Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/15s; manual focus

Fish 6: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/15s; manual focus

Fish 6: Vivitar 28mm f/2 at f/2, 1/15s; manual focus

Eels 1: Pentax DA 16-45mm f/4 at f/4, 1/30s

Eels 1: Pentax DA 16-45mm f/4 at f/4, 1/30s

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